Reading Without Limits

Maddie Witter

Intervention Grab Bag

Here are different interventions that you can do with your students.

Type Who’s it great for? What does it look like? Tips?
Pre-teaching Students with low academic self-confidence Pre-teach the lesson you are going to teach tomorrow using the same worksheets that you would use.  This is totally sustainable if you’ve already put together your materials. Tell the kids why you are doing what you are doing.  At the end, tell a couple kids that you will be calling on them specifically to answer one of the tough questions.  Write that question on a sticky so they have time to think then ask that question of them in their large class.  When they get it right in front of all of their peers, they will get a self-confidence boost!
Card Games Students who are unable to identify vocabulary words on assessments Go Fish:A “pair” is a definition matched with its word.  Students have to ask for the definition/word opposite.For example, if you wanted a match for your own card “diligent” you would ask your partner “do you have work hard?”If they don’t, Go Fish J Make the materials on card stock or laminate them so you can frequently re-use them.
Conferencing Students who need one on one help Do an extended conference, but make sure to ask them why or how they are making the mistakes they are making.  Ex) Why did you put a comma there? It will be super informative to why they are making the same mistakes. Share food with the student to make it seem more home like.
Manipulatives Kids who like a change Do the work you would normally do on a white board, or use sentence strips, or read with viewer strips. Have 4-5 different manipulatives on hand that can be used for a variety of activities in case you want to change things up.

Additional Resource: http://www.interventioncentral.org/

Maddie’s Tip:

I highly recommend spending a few hours making your own intervention cart.  It will make a big pay off in the long run.

  1. Get a trolley/cart with multiple shelves.  The more shelves, the better.
  2. Categorize each shelf into skills that you often would need to cover with an intervention group.a.      For reading this list would be:

                                                               i.      Fix It Strategies

                                                             ii.      Phonics/Phonemes

                                                            iii.      Retell

                                                           iv.      Comprehension Questions

                                                             v.      Fluency

3.       Put all materials and hand outs into each drawer.

a.      Make 10-15 copies of old lessons that fall into that category

b.      Print out graphic organizers (10-15 copies) that fall into that category

c.       Make games for that category

The key is to print out all copies in advance, so once intervention time comes along, you can just grab your cart and go.  You could make 2-3 months of intervention materials in advance and it saves a lot of time in the end.

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This entry was posted on February 23, 2010 by in Small Group Resources and tagged , .

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